11 New Fall and Winter Book Releases That’ll Inspire You When You’re Stuck at Home

Fall can often be dreary. Cold, isolating, and boring — plus a global pandemic and an unknown government situation can only add to those feelings. So, I like to curl up with a blanket and a book and shut out the world by escaping to my array of fictional worlds from my personal library. Anyone surprised?

So, settle in for another installment of Miranda’s Book Nook as I share even more new book titles that coming out this fall and winter that just I can’t get enough of. Happy reading, y’all!

Dearly by Margaret Atwood

In this brand-new book of poetry from acclaimed author Margaret Atwood, there’s an assortment of compelling and impactful poems, each that tells a story full of compelling language. These poems aim to make you think, feel, dream, desire, yearn — basically all of the feels.

There are some wanderlust motifs inside that make me just want to be able to travel again. Plus, messages about being remembered, which from story to story, we will definitely remember everything that Atwood has shown us long after we’ve closed the book’s pages.

Each poem effortlessly flows from one to the next and the book is impeccably organized, where I can see how poems and stories are related to each other with its seamless, well-positioned transitions. The tones and points of view are very realistic to the modern world, and while most are less doe-eyed optimistic, it skews on the darker side. There are rhyme schemes that just flow so well when you read these poems aloud. There’s definitely a motif of sisterhood and women sticking together in their fight for survival, forgiveness, love, and strength. Would you expect anything less from Atwood’s work? Because she does feminist writings very well and with covering such meaningful themes. The poems have such rich language and captivating word choice that tells complex stories that capture the readers due to strong symbols and metaphors. This is definitely a poetry collection I need to add to my personal library as soon as I can.

Available: Now


I Want to Be Where the Normal People Are by Rachel Bloom

This book of essays is by Rachel Bloom, who’s the creator and star of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, a show that I was a huge fan of. Her TV series was full of witty dialogue, which prompted my initial interest in this nonfiction read. First off, the cover gives me throwback The Babysitter’s Club book cover vibes, which is so much fun in itself.

Then, inside, the text is composed of relatable, conversational language that’s both funny and impactful. It’s focused on a bunch of different stories chronicling everything from childhood, selling the CXG series, falling in love, and more. Sure, these stories may be full of funny language and jokes, but they all have deeper meanings with plenty of heart. The read is told through first-person accounts, make-believe stories, original scripts, her actual childhood diary entries, and even Harry Potter fanfiction! Bloom’s tone of voice in this book of essays is very relatable, which makes me laugh out loud because, like, I GET IT. After reading, it makes you realize, ‘Oh, hey I wasn’t normal either and who cares because being me is much more rewarding and fun.’ It gives hope to all us theatre kids out there about our futures and that things will get better. It’s a one-sitting read because it was enjoyable, funny, relatable, honest, and authentic.

Available: November 17


It Only Happens in the Movies by Holly Bourne

I had loved Holly Bourne’s novel Pretending earlier this year and her compelling characterizations and perspectives. So I was instantly excited to read this new book and its fun premise. Here, British teen Audrey is currently dealing with the aftermath of her parents’ divorce, her own breakup, and her changing friend dynamics, all of which have made her cynical about the concept of love and romance. However, she soon finds herself falling for the ever-charming playboy Harry from her part-time job at the local cinema, even though she knows she shouldn’t.

From the prologue alone, I was hooked. Full of compelling and relatable language and a fresh perspective, I just couldn’t put it down. I had to keep reading. Then, the first chapter dives right into the action rather than pages upon pages of exposition and background, which I appreciated. So, Audrey’s working on a school project about the unrealistic behaviors in romance movies and is starring in Harry’s own movie as the love interest character, where she’s facing whether or not she still believes love is hopeless. This book is just so easy to get sucked into and I just didn’t want to put it down. It’s a quick, fun, and engaging YA read. The lead character of Audrey, by the ending, is so vulnerable and full of heart that reads as authentic. By the end, I just couldn’t stop reading, it had me enthralled and hooked to find out the rest of her story and what she actually wants.

Sure, the ending was cheesy and cute, but I’m glad that it didn’t just end on a romantic HEA, but rather a self-love HEA, which I find even more impactful and empowering. It made me happy to see her realizing her worth and becoming stronger because, hey, real life isn’t the perfectly curated movies, and I admire this book bringing that realism.

Available: December 1


Teddy Spenser Isn’t Looking for Love by Kim Fielding

This quick, fast-paced romance read was absolutely adorable, chock full of enemies-to-lovers, business trips with a shared hotel room, and opposites-attract tropes that made it just delightful to complete.

Here, Teddy Spenser and his work rival Romeo Blue are assigned to collaborate on a big work project that could save the fate of the company, a tech startup in Chicago. Teddy is quite cynical about love at first, but cannot deny that Romeo is very dapper. This book is full of funny, relatable language that makes Teddy such an authentic, engaging protagonist. The men are complete opposites, yet both seem to have been pining for the other a bit. But, it isn’t until their work trip in Seattle where they discover each other’s true selves: mind, body, and soul. This read is so quick and engaging, which makes it so easy to get sucked into. The writing is witty and sharp in this slow-burn love story. It’s just so freaking adorable, like audibly squeal-worthy.

Available: December 29


West End Girls by Jenny Colgan

I was really excited to read Jenny Colgan’s newest book, however, this seems to have fallen a bit flat and wasn’t my exact cup of tea. Not that it was terrible, it just wasn’t my favorite.

Here, 27-year-old twins, Lizzie and Penny are complete opposites from Essex, yet are tasked with moving to London together to watch their paternal grandmother’s flat in Chelsea who was just moved into a nursing home. It’s confusing how the chapters abruptly change from the perspective of Lizzie, Penny, or artist Will who likes Penny. It took me a while to get into with all the perspective jumping, and because of that, it took longer for me to really dig these characters, which is a shame because typically Colgan does such a great job at characterization. Both girls want to find where they belong and their purpose, so this book follows their journey living in Chelsea, with jobs, love, family, and friends. It’s fun and cute, but just kind of like, eh, here’s a few months of their lives living in the West End. That’s all.

Available: January 5


The MeetCute Project by Rhiannon Richardson

This YA romance was utterly delightful and adorable, the perfect one-sitting read to get sucked into on a cozy Sunday, because, guilty, that definitely happened.

Here, teenager Mia has a jam-packed schedule between classes, friends, and her growing extracurriculars. Thanks to all of that and how nervous she gets around boys, she’s single. For her older sister Sam’s upcoming wedding, Mia is instructed to bring a date to help balance out the wedding photos since she’s the only one sans a partner. To do so, her three best friends play matchmaker and arrange a series of meet-cutes to help Mia meet a prospective date.

It’s such a cute premise and the characters and language are so authentic and relatable, I can’t help but get sucked into this book. In addition to the blind dates, there’s the jerkish Ben who she has a crush on but her besties don’t approve of, and also Gavin who works at the community garden she starts to volunteer at, so this love triangle gets a bit bigger. She and Gavin have a completely organic meet-cute all on their own and made me scream out, several times, to just tell each other how they feel because it was so painfully obvious and I just wanted that be endgame here. As all of her friends’ setups go awry in different ways, she turns to Gavin like a Cyrano-type to ask for advice from a boy’s perspective. This book was so captivating that I just couldn’t put it down and ended up finishing it in a single sitting. This quick read is absolutely and positively cute, and that ending, however predictable, was just adorable.

Available: January 12


Everybody (Else) Is Perfect by Gabrielle Korn

This memoir slash collection of essays from the former EIC of Nylon Magazine shares her own experience escaping the hamster world of the corporate world and success, especially as a journalist. She notes how, since resigning, she’s been able to focus on her personal wellbeing, which isn’t tied to work success.

Through a series of essays, Korn shares memories about her place in life at work and covering articles she believed in, and her personal identity journey. This book handles such raw, vulnerable topics in a way that’s well-written, compelling, and authentic. There’s definitely some very empowering scenes that encourage us readers to remember that while we all may be insecure, we shouldn’t be and instead embrace our authentic selves fully. She reveals her internal struggles, personal identity journey and growth, and how she got where she is today both personally and professionally. Now, as a journalist and lifestyle writer/editor myself, I came for the professional advice and guides to help further my own career goals, but I ended up reading something that was way more, with lessons about embracing my entire self with confidence and not just sacrificing my personal life for the sake of the job of my dreams.

Available: January 26


Love is a Revolution by Renée Watson

First, I always love to see both racial and body diversity in a book, especially with YA and a romance, which historically doesn’t have the best reputation for it. But seeing that change is so great to see. This book takes place the summer before senior year, where Nala loves making lists and dreams of changing her hair, hanging with friends and family, and falling in love on this school break. Then, she meets a new boy in town, Tye, and she has a big crush on him. He’s very involved with the same community organization as her cousin, and so Nala tries whatever it takes to keep his attention even if it involves little fibs about also being a vegetarian and a volunteer because now he’s interested in this fake version of her. These lies pile up and get bigger and bigger as they start to date and she keeps pretending, and it’s almost like he tries to get her to be what’s she’s not and so, while there is a romantic love story, the main focus is on a self-love journey.

There’s such an authentic teen point of view and compelling language that makes me want to keep reading right off the bat. It’s a quick read that I could polish off in a single sitting because I just couldn’t put it down in the middle, and I was just so invested. In the end, it was just so adorable and I loved how it was more than just a romantic love story, but rather a focus on her journey to self-acceptance and confidence.

Available: February 2


How to Date Your Wardrobe by Heather Newberger

In this short guidebook, stylist Heather Newberger aims to help you reinvent your wardrobe and learn tricks to become more confident in your own skin. It’s all about inspiring your self-confidence, and less about what clothes to specifically wear through her helpful strategies and processes honed through her years as a stylist.

The quick book has an informative, yet conversational tone that feels approachable, realistic, and yet is still seen as an expert here to help. It’s a book for those readers who are seeking a way to upgrade your style and closet with pieces that speak to you and make you feel like a million bucks. She offers handy pop-up pro tips throughout with specific examples of how to put her strategies into action to really focus on how to figure out your own personal style and harnessing that. She brings further tips about shopping, including where to go, mixing things up, and how to navigate the online marketplace. Want to know what this book is really like? It’s like Marie Kondo or The Home Edit or other types of similar organization shows where I immediately get super inspired to redo everything I own right away. It’s like that. All in all, it’s mostly about inspiring you to think critically about clothes so that you only have and wear what you love, need, and make you feel like a star.

Available: February 9


First Comes Like by Alisha Rai

I’ve been waiting to read and review this book for so long, like you don’t understand how excited I am to actually have this baby in my hands right now. As you know well by now, I devoured Alisha Rai’s first two books in her “Modern Love” series: The Right Swipe and Girl Gone Viral. In both swoon-worthy contemporary romances, we were briefly introduced to Rhi and Kat’s third roomie, Jia, who’s a mega-popular beauty influencer. Now, it’s Jia’s turn for some love, and hopefully, get a quick update on how our fave HEAs are doing up in Santa Monica after their books.

We start off with a nervous Jia about to crash a Hollywood party to meet her crush Dev, an international actor, whom she thinks slid into her DMs a year ago and continued to chat with her. However, he doesn’t recognize her and she realizes that she was catfished. Like the previous two books in the series, we see back-and-forth perspectives to get insight into both Dev and Jia’s inner thoughts. While he doesn’t recognize her, Dev is quite mesmerized by her beauty and confidence from the moment he saw her at that party. Also, it was great to see that Rhi and Kat both still have their HEAs with their love interests. That made me squeal, once again, because I love to see that.

This book was a tad slow to start, especially in comparison to The Right Swipe and Girl Gone Viral, and I was just waiting for more than one hundred pages for that heat and action to pick up. And honestly, I’m just not as invested or feeling the butterflies as I was reading the first two books, this feels a lot slower. Back to the story, Dev wants to make up for the catfishing and agrees to her terms to fake date each other to appease her parents, but at the same time, they keep getting to know each other and the feelings deepen. There’s a lot of build-up, but then during the road trip scene, that’s the turning point for them and the book because that’s where things start to pick up.

The POVs flip midchapter in some parts, which can be a bit abrupt at times. However, this book is still cute and true to Rai’s style. Yes, it’s less steamy and more romantic compared to her other books in the “Modern Love” series, but once again, I couldn’t put it down. This book makes such a sweet addition to the series with a cute HEA and a similar style to the other books — as soon as the pacing picked up halfway through.

Available: February 16


Jew-ish: A Cookbook by Jake Cohen

Think: A recipe book for all the modern millennial Jews because that’s pretty much what we have here.

In this cookbook full of “reinvented recipes from a modern mensch,” it’s the perfect way for modern millennials to up their cooking game and put their own spin on the classic Jewish dishes they were raised on. The cookbook features loads of helpful tricks and tips told through first-person experiences from the author. Cohen includes recipes for everyday dining and meals to serve for the big holidays too, organized by meal, holiday, and beverages. Each category has such a variety of items included too. Each recipe gives you detailed instructions so that even the most basic of cooks, and non-cooks like me, can follow along and execute the steps. Each page features conversational language, that’s relatable and authentic to the reader. Then, each recipe has a little intro about the dish’s origin and history, plus the author’s tricks to modernize it and make it taste delicious with its step-by-step detailed instructions.

The book features some of the most gorgeous food photography I’ve ever seen, and I swear my mouth is watering already. Seriously, I’m not much of a cook or baker, but there’s a whole host of recipes that even I cannot wait to try.

Available: March 9


Advance reader copies of the books listed were provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

8 New Book Releases to Keep You Busy This Summer

Since clearly we’ll be spending our summers cooped up inside during this whole extended pandemic, we need to have an arsenal of activities at the ready to keep us busy. My solution is obviously to read a lot. Think, even if you can’t go or travel anywhere, then at least you can travel inside your books to imaginative lands and places.

Miranda’s Book Nook is back just in time for summer fun with a slate of new, original reads that are sure to keep you entertained no matter what.

Camp Girls by Iris Krasnow

This is the right memoir for any former sleepaway camper. Camp Girls captures the magic of sleepaway camp that any former camper or counselor will know all too well. As a former camper who spent eight summers in the Minnesota wilderness at a small all-girls sleepaway camp, I couldn’t stop grinning at the biography’s authenticity and Krasnow’s reasons why camp is so special to so many of us.

The memoir is told through the author’s own biographical memories, camper testimonials, and plenty of research, and Krasnow told a compelling tale about why camp matters to so many of us. I swear, with every chapter and new story introduced, I kept thinking back to my own wacky camp stories and friends! I just couldn’t stop smiling, laughing, or even crying. The book itself did feel quite short in terms of page length: I wanted more. I wanted it to trigger even more memories because camp was such a special place for me, and this book made me yearn to remember how far I’ve come and how camp has made me, well, me.

Available: Now!


The Trouble with Hating You by Sajni Patel

Enemies-to-lovers is my favorite romance trope because the romance feels justified and earned by the time the leads realize their feelings. This novel lives up to that and is 100 percent adorable. Totally squeal-worthy. I love how independent our protagonist Liya is and how cute Jay is as he’s head over heels in love with her, even when she tried to push him away. Seriously, I could feel my heart beating so loud during this sweeping, romantic, and cute story! In fact, I couldn’t stop reading this story even way past midnight; I just had to find out what happened next because their love story feels so real, authentic, and earned as these two people break past their boundaries to eventually find love and acceptance.

The book starts where headstrong engineer Liya walks out the door of a dinner party set up with an eligible bachelor whom her folks are trying to marry her off to. It’s a shock to both of them when Liya keeps spotting her one-time suitor around town, and it’s Jay. Jay has everything right on paper, but after Liya’s behavior during that first meeting he’s embarrassed and infuriated to see her. Although, that tension is too much to resist in this second chance love story.

Liya is realistic and a character that you can relate to, from seeing her break down and let him into her world and her heart, which was so moving to read. Also telling this story using diverse characters is a huge step for the genre in terms of representation and what we need more of: more perspectives and different people’s stories. The book is beyond cute by the end and I just need a sequel right now to see where their love story went. Completely precious.

Available: Now!


Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld

No one should be surprised that a Sittenfeld novel earns five stars from me. After all, I still re-read Eligible a few times a year. Her newest novel reimagines Hillary Clinton’s life and political career stemming from one question, “What if she hadn’t married Bill Clinton?”

The fact that this compelling novel was based upon one of my feminist heroes and was authored by one of my favorite authors, I was initially drawn to this book. Then once I started it, I just couldn’t put it down until I finished it! The beginning feels a bit like Hillary Clinton’s biography, but that just proves how well researched it was on Sittenfeld’s part. Then, you get into her fictionalized portrayal of relationships, career What Ifs, and more.

It’s so cute, interesting, and feisty and fierce at the same time, I honestly couldn’t stop reading. Sittenfeld’s portrayal of Hillary is everything a young Miranda emulated and to see that woman can be strong and powerful without the help of a man was inspiring and just everything. Much like Eligible, I couldn’t put it down and yearned to finish it in a single sitting. (Mission accomplished on that front!) This book is like the empowering twist of history we’ve needed and yearned for since 2016 and I’m so glad to have read it.

Available: May 19


Troop 6000 by Nikita Stewart

As a Girl Scout alumna, I was touched to pick up this true story about how the first Girl Scout troop out of a New York homeless shelter was started, as well as both the leaders’ and girls’ commitment to the core values of Scouts that made my heart swell. The nonfiction read also provided an in-depth look at the homelessness crisis in New York, amongst other cities, and shined a light on these kids and their lives and hopes. The book shows that despite all our differences, at the end of the day, everyone is an equal Girl Scout sister and it’s such an inspiring story that makes you as a reader want to do more to help.

The book depicts the growth and eventual popularity of this new troop as readers get an inside look at troop leader and founder Giselle Burgess, her family of five kids, and other Scouts and their families from the troop. New York Times journalist Nikita Stewart accurately told the life stories and dreams of these Scouts and their families for an authentic portrayal. It’s a remarkable story and I’m glad it was shared with the world.

Available: May 19


Happy and You Know It by Laura Hankin

While it takes a minute to figure out the different chapter perspectives and get into the root of the story in the witty read, it soon evolves into a very interesting and compelling read. The chapters are quite lengthy, however, it reads quickly thanks to an engaging storytelling that you just want to keep reading to find out what happens next.

The book starts when a struggling Manhattan musician is hired to play music for a mommy-and-me playgroup amongst NYC’s elite residents. Musician Claire is soon pulled into these women’s oh-so-glamorous lives and dangerous secrets. They make up an Instagram-perfect clique: hostess with the most-ess Whitney is an aspiring influencer, recent SAHM Amara is struggling to adapt to her new role, and old-money Gwen is quick to dole out Mommy advice as a mom of two. Soon, spending time with these moms, Claire is thrust into their glamorous world and discovers unsettling truths that could tear the group apart for good.

In the book, the twist at the end in regards to one of the characters is wow, just so unexpected, like, huh she’s truly an evil genius with chutzpah. Doing all of the *this* for her babies and her families. The book keeps getting juicier with every secret out, which there is plenty, and I couldn’t stop reading until it was way past midnight and I finished the book.

Available: May 19


Recipe for Persuasion by Sonali Dev

It’s a sweet women’s fiction novel, with clear callbacks to Jane Austen’s Persuasion. However, the three different perspectives came out of nowhere from the start, especially our protagonist Ashna’s mom’s POV. In contrast, The two characters of Ashna and Rico, you expect to be the different perspectives but not her mom, Shobi. It does help add to the story to make it way more than just a romance between a man and a woman, but also a relationship between mother and daughter. Shobi’s storyline is very, very different from Ashna and Rico’s the one who got away trope. It just caught me off guard at first. The different points of view are quite drastic flipping between one another, and without any chapter headers to help guide readers, and different timelines all over the place, it’s confusing when reading.

In the novel, chef Ashna Raje is desperately looking for a new way to save her family restaurant. Her plan becomes to win the “Cooking with the Stars,” a cooking show competition inspired by Dancing with the Stars. However, she certainly didn’t plan on hopeless cook and soccer star Rico Silva to be her partner, especially considering he was her [secret] first love. But, the viewers are obsessed with their flame-worthy chemistry and ok, fine, so am I.

The story is a complete slow burn, and by more than halfway,  you’re still wondering where is the *big* moment or something. I feel like I’m just waiting and waiting for the big climax and something to happen. But the book is well written and intriguing and certainly drew me in, but maybe that’s because I just wanted more. The time jumps are unclear and abrupt, there needs to be a header or a different font or italics to signify a flashback from the present day. As is, without something, there’s an element of confusion. All in all, the story does put a diverse spin on a Jane Austen classic, which is great to see in today’s world. It’s cute that’s for sure, but that’s about it. I’d give it a modest three stars.

Available: May 26


Ghosting: A Love Story by Tash Skilton

This book feels just like the movie You’ve Got Mail, but with a modern twist using the realm of dating apps. This enemies-to-lovers tale follows two rival dating app ghostwriters (which I was shocked to learn is a real job!) in a completely predictable yet sugary-sweet romance. From the beginning, I could immediately tell where the plot and characters were headed, and it took forever to build and get there;  almost too long. It’s a super cute read, but honestly, it’s nothing groundbreaking. Everything is expected.

In a Cyrano-type scenario, dating app ghostwriters Zoey and Miles (in back-and-forth perspectives) first only see each other as the jerk who hogs the best table at the coffee shop that they are both trying to work in. Soon, unbeknownst to the two them, they help ghostwrite and manage the dating app profiles of two clients interested in one another. Soon, Zoey and Miles (as their clients) find themselves bantering back and forth at all hours and turns out, they themselves have a bit of a love connection on their hands.

The sugary-sweet love story is a bit boring, and one I’ve seen play out again and again. I just wanted something new and more. But that being said, the end was equal parts adorable, steamy, and romantic. Hey, you gotta love a good enemies to lovers trope.

Available: May 26


500 Miles From You by Jenny Colgan

This was an engaging, quick read from the get-go and one that gave me so much wanderlust to return to London and visit Scotland. At first, the dual viewpoints switching back and forth is a bit confusing without chapter headings, but other than that, their perspectives are quite obvious. Both Lissa and Cormac make compelling protagonists in their own right and I liked following their stories, quite compelling. Think “The Holiday” but with medicine, because that’s basically the setup here as we follow two simultaneous fish-out-of-water stories and slowly, very slowly, a friendship builds. But, the pacing and timing of everything feels completely honest and genuine and it worked.

After an on-the-job traumatic event, nurse practitioner Lissa is sent from her bustling London hospital into the small town of Kirrinfief in Scotland for a change of pace. She swaps jobs and houses with army veteran and fellow nurse practitioner Cormac as they adapt to new roles and cities. But, they have each other to confide in, well, through email. But once their work emails turn to daily, constant texts (and even exchanging drawings), it’s clear they both feel something different is on the horizon. 

The novel is a love letter to small country life more than anything and I couldn’t stop smiling, for the most part. The end does feel quite abrupt like after finally meeting, after several near misses, they just jump into a kiss and a relationship. And for a relationship that was so slow, authentic, and cautious, this just feels a bit forced to make sure we cram a HEA in before the book ends. Also, I wasn’t the biggest fan of the epilogue and I’m not sure it was totally necessary in the first place. Sure, the part with the transplant family was so sweet, but other than that, nothing between Cormac and Lissa was resolved really, and that’s where I wanted to see the romance unfold in the epilogue, based on the book’s timing. Other than that, it was a very cute book that makes me want to head to the UK, like, right now.

Available: June 9


Advance reader copies of each book were provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.