My Summer 2018 Reading List

As you may know, I read a lot, like a lot. But is that necessarily a bad thing? Nope, not in my eyes! And with summer fast approaching and my vacay plans finalized that means it’s time to get my summer reads in order (preferably in time to pack in my carry on before I get on the plane). So, what am I reading this summer?

“A Lady’s Guide to Selling Out” by Sally Franson

This debut novel is describes a brilliant young woman navigating a “tricky twenty-first-century career” and who she wants to be in this “savagely wise debut novel in the tradition of The Devil Wears Prada.” The novel follows protagonist Casey, a book-loving English major now “selling out” and working for a top ad agency, finding it perplexing how quick some clients are willing to compromise their integrity, and then when Casey is faced with a situation (lol I don’t want to spoil too much),  she can “no longer ignore her own nagging doubts about the human cost of success.”

With “observations about everything from feminism, pop culture, and social media,” this novel is the “story of a young woman untangling the contradictions of our era and trying to escape the rat race– by any means necessary.” Summer read, yes please!

“Crazy Rich Asians” by Kevin Kwan

I have to admit, the trailer of the movie adaptation first peaked my interest. I mean, I always saw it on the bookstore shelves during one of my routine browses. But IDK, nothing really pulled me to the cover and the title to read the back summary or the first few pages over the thousands of other books around it. And then, when I saw the trailer, immediately I was hooked. It seemed like the perfect summer read.

So, in case you’ve ben living under a rock and missed the national bestseller or its movie trailer ads, the book chronicles New Yorker Rachel who agrees to accompany her boyfriend home to Singapore to meet his “traditional” family. But what she doesn’t know? His childhood home is a palace, they will be attending his cousin’s “wedding of the year,” he’s one of Asia’s most eligible bachelors, and his mother isn’t quite sure Rachel is the right one for her son. Dramatic? Juicy? I’m so in.

“The Favorite Sister” by Jessica Knoll

As you may remember a few months ago, I read Knoll’s debut book “Luckiest Girl Alive.” And devoured it. Well, she just released her next novel, and from the Amazon summary alone, I’m hooked. It’s a “blisteringly paced thriller starring two sisters who join the cast of a reality TV series,” where “one won’t make it out alive. So… who did it?” Now, I’m not usually a thriller or mystery-type reader, but I was hooked on her last book and the summary.

So, five “hyper-successful women” agree to appear on a NYC reality series called ‘Goal Diggers,’ where the first season ends unexpectedly ends in murder. Now, that seems a bit like Lifetime’s “UnREAL” a bit (without the dating competition part), and that had me intrigued. The novel “explores the invisible barriers that prevent women from rising up the ranks in today’s America—and offers a scathing take on the oft-lionized bonds of sisterhood, and the relentless pressure to stay young, relevant, and salable.” Added to my Amazon cart ASAP.

“Marriage Vacation” by Pauline Turner Brooks

I’m a HUGE fan of TVLand’s “Younger.” (Like OMG how is season five going to go down???) As fans will certainly remember from season 4, #TeamCharles was briefly disrupted by the arrival (or more like, return) of Charles’ ex-wife who comes back to the city, armed with a new manuscript for Liza’s attention and wanting to put her family back together in their blissful Upper East Side life. Then this spring, the powers that be annoucehed that her popular novel on the show was hitting bookstore shelves IRL! I mean, yes please! Even if only to find out what’s on page 58 for ourselves.

For those non-“Younger” fans, one: go watch the show (it’s all there on Hulu to binge, you’re welcome for tip). And two, here’s a bit about the book. Kate Carmichael has a seemingly perfect life: two adorable daughters, an Upper East Side prewar townhouse, and a devoted husband who runs a successful publishing company in NYC. But when Kate reconnects with her successful friends from school, she sees her life in a different way in the career she didn’t pursue and the dreams she hid away. And so, she flies halfway around the world for what was supposed to only be a few weeks, instead of returning to her family, to clear her head and reconnect with those former dreams. But her adventure “doesn’t go quite as planned.” Intrigued? And not just find out what TV Charles did on page 58. And onto my Amazon preorder list it goes until it’s early June release…

I’m already super pumped to start reading, although my patience is really being tested to not get carried away and start reading now, and waiting until my flight takes off and I’m officially in vacation mode to savor these new reads.

Keep on reading!

March/April 2018 Reading List

After quickly completing my January and February reading lists, once again I was on the hunt for some new reads. And so, what naturally follows? Heading to Barnes & Noble to browse through every single fiction aisle and shelf and see what strikes my fancy, naturally. And boy, did I find enough. Armed with a heavy bag of new books, I left the store ready to begin these new reading adventures.

“Bachelor Nation: Inside the World of America’s Favorite Guilty Pleasure” by Amy Kaufman

This nonfiction debut book from L.A. Times writer and self-proclaimed “Bachelor” fan, Amy Kaufman. Kaufman researched and interviewed experts to find out what really goes down in the Bachelor mansion while filming the hit reality franchise, and exploring why we all turn in week to week to watch it all unfold.

As an avid watcher of the franchise (lol could you tell from this blog??) and its fictional counterpart “UnREAL,” I was definitely as intrigued as I read the revelations from Kaufman’s original New York Post excerpt. I was curious, and so: reading list, here we go!

It wasn’t until Lifetime debuted “UnREAL,” that I even truly comprehended that something like “The Bachelor” or other reality shows were so produced. (I always knew they were scripted ala “Kardashians” but the dirty deeds of production? I was completely in the dark like most members of Bachelor Nation.) This book truly opened my eyes to how one of my ultimate guilty pleasures, so from now on (like Becca K’s ex showing up on this recent season? Come on.), in the name of media literacy, I can now comprehend what is actually going on and take the show as it is (a pleasure-filled dramatic television series) with a grain of salt. An interesting look at the psychology of a popular television franchise, how it gets made, and why we continue to enjoy watching such a trainwreck of drama.

“The Recipe Box” by Viola Shipman

The recently released novel explores the life of Sam, a busy sous chef for a hot New York bakery. Her life isn’t going as she planned, so she returns home to her small Michigan town to take inventory of her family’s orchard and pie shop. There, she discovers secrets and memories of her family, one recipe at a time in the heirloom recipe box. The inside cover continues, “As Sam discovers what matters most in her life, she opens her heart to a man she left behind but who now might be the key to her happiness.”

It seems intriguing, with a hint of cheesy romance often found in corny Hallmark romance movies. I’m in.

 

 

“Young Jane Young” by Gabrielle Zevin

The new novel by “The Storied Life of AJ Fikry” author illustrates the world of protagonist Aviva, a former congressional intern who was once the center of a political scandal that now may threaten her own bid for political office years later. The inside summary reads that this novel is a “smart, funny, serious, and moving novel about the myriad of ways in which roles are still circumscribed for women, whether they are young, ambitious interns; mothers attempting to steer their daughters through a male-dominated world; political wives facing an age-old knowledge that fidelity isn’t always honored; or young girls feeling bold about their many choices before they release the gender restrictions all around them.”

Seems interesting, especially as it tackles important issues that women still face everyday. Andddd… to page one we go.

“Hot Mess” by Emily Belden

In this installment of Miranda Reads Cheesy Millennial-Type Novels, Emily Belden’s “Hot Mess” seemed to intrigue me in such a way. The story centers around Allie, a twentysomething who is so infatuated by her love for sought-after, culinary genius Benji, despite storied past struggling with addiction and living an often-reckless lifestyle. When he is offered the job of a lifetime in creating a hot New York restaurant, Allie follows her love and takes a giant leap: investing her life savings in the establishment. What happens when Benji takes off on a relapse, leaving Allie alone with “nothing but a massive withdrawal slip” and an approaching opening day. She is suddenly thrust into the “world of luxury and greed, cutthroat business and sensory delight. Lost in the mess of it all, she can either crumble completely or fight like hell for the life she wants and the love she deserves.”

Seems promising and interesting to say the least, in a typical Millennial-centric novel, but let’s give it a shot.

“Needles and Pearls” by Gil McNeil

I was fascinated by Gil McNeil’s “Needles and Pearls” novel, which focuses on widow Jo, a year after her husband’s death, where she is finally getting used to being a single parent to her sons and her yarn shop is doing quite well to boot. But then, a man from her past arrives as well as a new romance with a local carpenter develops to “make life a whole lot more interesting.” The book tackles if Jo can “cope when things get complicated.”

Hm, tell me more… Guess I better read to find out?

 

 

 

Keep on reading! 💖