7 More New Books I Couldn’t Put Down

Oh, we’re still stuck at home? Ha ha ha, It’s July already. Well, I’ve still been reading and just powering through my spring-summer TBR, and finding even more new reads to add to it. And out of my latest reading list, I’ve discovered so many more new authors and books that I’ve loved that have provided some much-needed comfort during this weird time.

So, welcome back to Miranda’s Book Nook with more of my latest book recommendations. I hope you find these books as engaging, fun, impactful, and comforting as I have.

Just a Boy and a Girl in a Little Canoe by Sarah Mlynowski

Honestly, I immediately preordered this on Amazon as soon as I saw the title alone, because that happens to be one of my all-time favorite camp songs, “A Boy and a Girl in a Little Canoe,” so yea, it was a definite. Then, I read the description, and it was a YA romance set at sleepaway camp. Though, I went to an all-girls camp and never had a camp fling because we had no boys on the premises, it still remains one of my favorite teen romance tropes.

We follow Sam who’s summer isn’t off to a great start when her boyfriend Eli heads out on a European backpacking trip and she’s back at the summer camp she hated as a kid and now a counselor. There, she meets good-looking sailing counselor Gavin who also spends his free periods with his girlfriend who is also in Europe this summer. Cue the inevitable friendship, which of course, turns into a bona fide summer fling. While Eli is away and Gavin is right there, Sam learns exactly what she’s really looking for and what she isn’t. This book is sectioned off by the different camp weeks, from staff training, the first week, and the last week, which is how chapters are divided. It’s a fun, summertime YA read for all of us who are missing camp because they’re either too old or COVID ruined the fun.

Available: Now


Most Likely by Sarah Watson

Another book I knew I had to get immediately, but this time, based solely on the author. Sure, it’s her debut novel, but Sarah Watson created one of my all-time favorite TV series, The Bold Type, and that was enough to tell me I needed this book for my collection. Here, we follow for best friends throughout their senior year of high school, and one of whom will eventually be President of the United States — except you have no clue who it is.

BFFs Ava, CJ, Jordan, and Martha have been a foursome for their entire lives. By senior year, these vastly different personalities face their faces about growing up and what they want to do. The prologue indicates one girl is about to be sworn in as the first female president. But of course, we never see the name. This way, as you read the book, you can see each of the girls equalling taking on the gig. The prologue did set aside some hints that could potentially help you figure out which girl is the prez. Well, I had my predictions (which, of course, was right LOL), but even I kept second-guessing myself because it could have been anyone’s future story. They are all interesting, smart, and engaging characters on their own. And together? They are a powerful force to be reckoned with in this tale of four best friends who have each other’s back through all the highs and lows of high school and beyond.

Available: Now


The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins

Yep, of course I read the new Hunger Games book, no surprise there. Now, I don’t want to give too much away to avoid spoilers before other HG fans have a chance to power through all 500+ pages or the movie adaptation comes out. But, I do have to say that I didn’t hate it. And Snow as the protagonist, well, I didn’t hate him, but I certainly didn’t like him. That being said, it was interesting to see how Snow got to the dictator-like position he has the original book.

Here, we go back 60-something years to the morning of the tenth annual Games. For the first time, Capital teens at the prestigious Academy will serve as mentors to the tributes to jumpstart their adult societal statuses. Eighteen-year-old orphan Coriolanus Snow is assigned to mentor the female tribute from District 12, Lucy Gray Baird. You see, Snow needs this victory to restore his family’s position and wealth in society to what it once was. The Games are totally different early on, from the treatment of the tributes, the arena, and how the Games are watched/ how mentors are involved.

The book goes past an account of the Games because it’s a love story of sorts. I mean, whatever happens in the movie, we better get that Lucy-Snow compact scene, because I NEED IT. So adorable. We then see Snow and Lucy Gray navigate post-Games life, together and apart. And wowza, I did not see that twist ending coming with Snow’s ultimate fate and the master plan. I mean, mind blown.

Available: Now


You Had Me at Hola by Alexis Daria*

This was the ultimate, perfect summer beach rom-com read and I enjoyed devouring every morsel of Jasmine’s and Ashton’s stories. Here, readers are thrust into soap star Jasmine’s fast-paced Hollywood world immediately, and I’m captivated and just want to keep reading.  Both telenovela star Ashton and Jasmine have their own complex backstories, which makes them so much more vulnerable, intriguing, and dynamic as characters. It’s a quick, indulgent telenovela-inspired romance read and gives me Jane the Virgin vibes.

In the book, these two scene partners have a lack of chemistry after a mortifying first encounter. To build up their chemistry, the duo starts rehearsing on their own in private, and of course, they both have all the feels that they are desperately trying to ignore, because professionalism. All that tension and passion is brewing and is bound to explode. So, of course, the pair stars kissing and making out, even though they know its a bad idea. They just can’t quit each other, so we get the whole secret romance trope. Things do get, um, very steamy and descriptive, as a heads up if that’s not your thing, just a warning. But aside from that, these characters are vulnerable, emotional, and raw, and that’s why they make such endearing leads, and an eventual romance so interesting and sweet.

I love seeing more representation in the romance industry, and I love to see these romance stories are so reflective of today’s world and reality. The cute romance, the drama of telenovela, and the representation will have this all over romance readers’ radars this summer. Trust me on that one.

Available: August 4


Smash It! by Francina Simone*

This was an impactful and intriguing YA work with such a vibrant point of view, as I briefly referenced in my last post. The book features a fun, authentic tone to represent the protagonist Liv and I was so so so thrilled to see more diversity (race and body) representation in contemporary YA, I love that.

It’s the story of a shy girl who has an unrequited crush on one of her best friends. She’s ready to move and start living life, and be open to new possibilities, including finally trying out for the school musical. So, Liv makes a “F*ck It” list to inspire her to be bolder and free, and I want to make a list of my own.

The book is like a love square of romance and feelings and Liv is just so awkward and relatable, which is endearing as a reader. It’s realistic and engaging, and I love Liv’s growing sense of confidence. Like Othello, which is the school musical, there’s a lot going on with all the characters, and I just want to keep reading and get all the juicy details. Then, in the end, Eli and his letter to her is just so vulnerable and raw and I saw both of their whole hearts explode, and I felt all that emotion. As a good book should.

I’m so here for all these strong and empowered AF women that are owning their lives! Love to see it. Liv as a character finds her voice and confidence, which is so raw and honest and impactful. It made me smile to see her grow because that’s inspiring. If she can smash it, so can all of us.

Available: September 22


Spoiler Alert by Olivia Dade*

First off, I love a good geeky love story. So, I was instantly intrigued by this. This story reminds me of Ashley Polston’s YA geek romances, but obviously with adults. Here, we follow two anonymous virtual pen pals that chat through a fanfiction site about their favorite TV show characters and OTP. Both Marcus and April have descriptive point-of-views that make it exciting to read on. He’s the actual star of the show they’re writing fanfic about and she’s a massive fan of the show. Also, I love to see a body-positive lead in general, and also it brings more diversity to the cosplay community. That’s always great to see. April is so proud of herself and confident, and I love to see that; even though she’s not stick-thin, she still knows her value and deserves the world.

Within a few chapters, it’s already super cute. It’s sort of like the old musical She Loves Me, where he learns they are pen pals but keeps her in the dark instead of filling her in. It’s fun to read the actual fanfics and their DMs throughout the novel, as a nod to the backstory of the characters and how they met. It’s definitely a cute romance and plenty enjoyable.

Available: October 6


Come On In: 15 Stories about Immigration and Finding Home by Adi Alsaid*

This a compelling, touching anthology of short stories about immigration and the perspectives of teens who’ve dealt with it. It tells the stories of different teens all dealing with immigration (past and present) struggles and their own racial identities, as they find a sense of belonging. With everything that’s going on in the world right now and the important fight for social justice, it’s eye-opening to see so many different worldly perspectives through these essays. Obviously, as it is a collection, some essays were more engaging than others, but they all had a unique point of view.

We see the highs and lows of immigration through these stories written by so many acclaimed YA authors. These teen characters deal with being stopped on the street, TSA detention, customs anxiety, and the terrifying journey to new places. We see fifteen different parts of the immigrant experience on these characters’ (and authors) journey to find a home.

Available: October 13


*Advance reader copies of several of the books listed were provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

8 New Book Releases to Keep You Busy This Summer

Since clearly we’ll be spending our summers cooped up inside during this whole extended pandemic, we need to have an arsenal of activities at the ready to keep us busy. My solution is obviously to read a lot. Think, even if you can’t go or travel anywhere, then at least you can travel inside your books to imaginative lands and places.

Miranda’s Book Nook is back just in time for summer fun with a slate of new, original reads that are sure to keep you entertained no matter what.

Camp Girls by Iris Krasnow

This is the right memoir for any former sleepaway camper. Camp Girls captures the magic of sleepaway camp that any former camper or counselor will know all too well. As a former camper who spent eight summers in the Minnesota wilderness at a small all-girls sleepaway camp, I couldn’t stop grinning at the biography’s authenticity and Krasnow’s reasons why camp is so special to so many of us.

The memoir is told through the author’s own biographical memories, camper testimonials, and plenty of research, and Krasnow told a compelling tale about why camp matters to so many of us. I swear, with every chapter and new story introduced, I kept thinking back to my own wacky camp stories and friends! I just couldn’t stop smiling, laughing, or even crying. The book itself did feel quite short in terms of page length: I wanted more. I wanted it to trigger even more memories because camp was such a special place for me, and this book made me yearn to remember how far I’ve come and how camp has made me, well, me.

Available: Now!


The Trouble with Hating You by Sajni Patel

Enemies-to-lovers is my favorite romance trope because the romance feels justified and earned by the time the leads realize their feelings. This novel lives up to that and is 100 percent adorable. Totally squeal-worthy. I love how independent our protagonist Liya is and how cute Jay is as he’s head over heels in love with her, even when she tried to push him away. Seriously, I could feel my heart beating so loud during this sweeping, romantic, and cute story! In fact, I couldn’t stop reading this story even way past midnight; I just had to find out what happened next because their love story feels so real, authentic, and earned as these two people break past their boundaries to eventually find love and acceptance.

The book starts where headstrong engineer Liya walks out the door of a dinner party set up with an eligible bachelor whom her folks are trying to marry her off to. It’s a shock to both of them when Liya keeps spotting her one-time suitor around town, and it’s Jay. Jay has everything right on paper, but after Liya’s behavior during that first meeting he’s embarrassed and infuriated to see her. Although, that tension is too much to resist in this second chance love story.

Liya is realistic and a character that you can relate to, from seeing her break down and let him into her world and her heart, which was so moving to read. Also telling this story using diverse characters is a huge step for the genre in terms of representation and what we need more of: more perspectives and different people’s stories. The book is beyond cute by the end and I just need a sequel right now to see where their love story went. Completely precious.

Available: Now!


Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld

No one should be surprised that a Sittenfeld novel earns five stars from me. After all, I still re-read Eligible a few times a year. Her newest novel reimagines Hillary Clinton’s life and political career stemming from one question, “What if she hadn’t married Bill Clinton?”

The fact that this compelling novel was based upon one of my feminist heroes and was authored by one of my favorite authors, I was initially drawn to this book. Then once I started it, I just couldn’t put it down until I finished it! The beginning feels a bit like Hillary Clinton’s biography, but that just proves how well researched it was on Sittenfeld’s part. Then, you get into her fictionalized portrayal of relationships, career What Ifs, and more.

It’s so cute, interesting, and feisty and fierce at the same time, I honestly couldn’t stop reading. Sittenfeld’s portrayal of Hillary is everything a young Miranda emulated and to see that woman can be strong and powerful without the help of a man was inspiring and just everything. Much like Eligible, I couldn’t put it down and yearned to finish it in a single sitting. (Mission accomplished on that front!) This book is like the empowering twist of history we’ve needed and yearned for since 2016 and I’m so glad to have read it.

Available: May 19


Troop 6000 by Nikita Stewart

As a Girl Scout alumna, I was touched to pick up this true story about how the first Girl Scout troop out of a New York homeless shelter was started, as well as both the leaders’ and girls’ commitment to the core values of Scouts that made my heart swell. The nonfiction read also provided an in-depth look at the homelessness crisis in New York, amongst other cities, and shined a light on these kids and their lives and hopes. The book shows that despite all our differences, at the end of the day, everyone is an equal Girl Scout sister and it’s such an inspiring story that makes you as a reader want to do more to help.

The book depicts the growth and eventual popularity of this new troop as readers get an inside look at troop leader and founder Giselle Burgess, her family of five kids, and other Scouts and their families from the troop. New York Times journalist Nikita Stewart accurately told the life stories and dreams of these Scouts and their families for an authentic portrayal. It’s a remarkable story and I’m glad it was shared with the world.

Available: May 19


Happy and You Know It by Laura Hankin

While it takes a minute to figure out the different chapter perspectives and get into the root of the story in the witty read, it soon evolves into a very interesting and compelling read. The chapters are quite lengthy, however, it reads quickly thanks to an engaging storytelling that you just want to keep reading to find out what happens next.

The book starts when a struggling Manhattan musician is hired to play music for a mommy-and-me playgroup amongst NYC’s elite residents. Musician Claire is soon pulled into these women’s oh-so-glamorous lives and dangerous secrets. They make up an Instagram-perfect clique: hostess with the most-ess Whitney is an aspiring influencer, recent SAHM Amara is struggling to adapt to her new role, and old-money Gwen is quick to dole out Mommy advice as a mom of two. Soon, spending time with these moms, Claire is thrust into their glamorous world and discovers unsettling truths that could tear the group apart for good.

In the book, the twist at the end in regards to one of the characters is wow, just so unexpected, like, huh she’s truly an evil genius with chutzpah. Doing all of the *this* for her babies and her families. The book keeps getting juicier with every secret out, which there is plenty, and I couldn’t stop reading until it was way past midnight and I finished the book.

Available: May 19


Recipe for Persuasion by Sonali Dev

It’s a sweet women’s fiction novel, with clear callbacks to Jane Austen’s Persuasion. However, the three different perspectives came out of nowhere from the start, especially our protagonist Ashna’s mom’s POV. In contrast, The two characters of Ashna and Rico, you expect to be the different perspectives but not her mom, Shobi. It does help add to the story to make it way more than just a romance between a man and a woman, but also a relationship between mother and daughter. Shobi’s storyline is very, very different from Ashna and Rico’s the one who got away trope. It just caught me off guard at first. The different points of view are quite drastic flipping between one another, and without any chapter headers to help guide readers, and different timelines all over the place, it’s confusing when reading.

In the novel, chef Ashna Raje is desperately looking for a new way to save her family restaurant. Her plan becomes to win the “Cooking with the Stars,” a cooking show competition inspired by Dancing with the Stars. However, she certainly didn’t plan on hopeless cook and soccer star Rico Silva to be her partner, especially considering he was her [secret] first love. But, the viewers are obsessed with their flame-worthy chemistry and ok, fine, so am I.

The story is a complete slow burn, and by more than halfway,  you’re still wondering where is the *big* moment or something. I feel like I’m just waiting and waiting for the big climax and something to happen. But the book is well written and intriguing and certainly drew me in, but maybe that’s because I just wanted more. The time jumps are unclear and abrupt, there needs to be a header or a different font or italics to signify a flashback from the present day. As is, without something, there’s an element of confusion. All in all, the story does put a diverse spin on a Jane Austen classic, which is great to see in today’s world. It’s cute that’s for sure, but that’s about it. I’d give it a modest three stars.

Available: May 26


Ghosting: A Love Story by Tash Skilton

This book feels just like the movie You’ve Got Mail, but with a modern twist using the realm of dating apps. This enemies-to-lovers tale follows two rival dating app ghostwriters (which I was shocked to learn is a real job!) in a completely predictable yet sugary-sweet romance. From the beginning, I could immediately tell where the plot and characters were headed, and it took forever to build and get there;  almost too long. It’s a super cute read, but honestly, it’s nothing groundbreaking. Everything is expected.

In a Cyrano-type scenario, dating app ghostwriters Zoey and Miles (in back-and-forth perspectives) first only see each other as the jerk who hogs the best table at the coffee shop that they are both trying to work in. Soon, unbeknownst to the two them, they help ghostwrite and manage the dating app profiles of two clients interested in one another. Soon, Zoey and Miles (as their clients) find themselves bantering back and forth at all hours and turns out, they themselves have a bit of a love connection on their hands.

The sugary-sweet love story is a bit boring, and one I’ve seen play out again and again. I just wanted something new and more. But that being said, the end was equal parts adorable, steamy, and romantic. Hey, you gotta love a good enemies to lovers trope.

Available: May 26


500 Miles From You by Jenny Colgan

This was an engaging, quick read from the get-go and one that gave me so much wanderlust to return to London and visit Scotland. At first, the dual viewpoints switching back and forth is a bit confusing without chapter headings, but other than that, their perspectives are quite obvious. Both Lissa and Cormac make compelling protagonists in their own right and I liked following their stories, quite compelling. Think “The Holiday” but with medicine, because that’s basically the setup here as we follow two simultaneous fish-out-of-water stories and slowly, very slowly, a friendship builds. But, the pacing and timing of everything feels completely honest and genuine and it worked.

After an on-the-job traumatic event, nurse practitioner Lissa is sent from her bustling London hospital into the small town of Kirrinfief in Scotland for a change of pace. She swaps jobs and houses with army veteran and fellow nurse practitioner Cormac as they adapt to new roles and cities. But, they have each other to confide in, well, through email. But once their work emails turn to daily, constant texts (and even exchanging drawings), it’s clear they both feel something different is on the horizon. 

The novel is a love letter to small country life more than anything and I couldn’t stop smiling, for the most part. The end does feel quite abrupt like after finally meeting, after several near misses, they just jump into a kiss and a relationship. And for a relationship that was so slow, authentic, and cautious, this just feels a bit forced to make sure we cram a HEA in before the book ends. Also, I wasn’t the biggest fan of the epilogue and I’m not sure it was totally necessary in the first place. Sure, the part with the transplant family was so sweet, but other than that, nothing between Cormac and Lissa was resolved really, and that’s where I wanted to see the romance unfold in the epilogue, based on the book’s timing. Other than that, it was a very cute book that makes me want to head to the UK, like, right now.

Available: June 9


Advance reader copies of each book were provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.